Tag Archives: solidarity economy

Greeks, refugees and a cooperative resurrection

The all-win scenario

This year1 brought to global attention two processes, simmering for years already. The so-called „Greek debt crisis” and „Syrian refugees crisis”2.

I have been watching them closely for months, since I arrived to Greece. I keep expressing my views on them every once a while, so again, this is not the main story for today. Today, let me tell you a story about resurrection. Continue reading Greeks, refugees and a cooperative resurrection

The Octagon

Towards a solidarity economy investment fund1­

This text as a PDF: The-Octagon

1. Digest.

This document outlines a structure and certain processes of an investment fund, dedicated for the solidarity economy area.

The model fund, called „The Octagon”, will be an intermediary between the realm of solidarity economy and the external entities, at the inter-community level.

The main role of The Octagon is to mediate between solidarity and non-solidarity entities, providing flow of funds to the solidarity sector and non-financial benefits to the external stakeholders. It will also play a role of a firewall, separating solidarity entities from the pressure put by non-solidarity environment.

The whole system will be based upon principles of solidarity economy, open technologies and cooperative movement. Continue reading The Octagon

The March of the 10 000 000

“abandoned in northern Mesopotamia, without supplies other than what they could obtain by force or diplomacy, the 10,000 had to fight their way northwards through Corduen and Armenia, making ad hoc decisions about their leadership, tactics, provender and destiny, while the King’s army and hostile natives barred their way and attacked their flanks.”

Whatever good or bad we may say about the Greeks, their recent struggle to regain their own country, their independence, is much more impressive than the attempted coup of Cyrus the Younger, which started the original Anabasis. Since 2008, Greek society was struggling with the consequences of their own vices, their greedy oligarchy, their rotten political class and the international banksters, marauding left and right.

Until 2013 they developed vast network of solidarity economy, effectively becoming a parallel one, replacing both state and capitalist economy wherever they failed to fulfill needs of the people. With the raising hopes for Syriza-created government, much of this momentum was lost. The energy was redirected to support Syriza in its ice-breaking mission, which culminated last winter and recently failed. Continue reading The March of the 10 000 000